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themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative position of the united states and the islamic republic of a rant in middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11 over 10 years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east with either pro-american government egypt and turkey in negotiation effectively to become pro-american but government. in libya are anti-iranian like saddam hussein's government in iraq. every single government in the middle east is either pro-americans in negotiations to become pro-american or anti-iranian. it pretty good position for the 90s dates in the middle
'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islam you can republic of iran." the first of these themes, and these two really get at the heart of our book. the first of these themes is that the united states is today and has been for the past few years a power in relative decline in the middle east. and the second core theme is that the biggest beneficiary of america's ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative positions of the united states and the islamic republic of iran in the middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11, just over ten years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east was either pro-american, like the governments in egypt and turkey, in negotiations effectively to become pro-american, like the governments in syria and libya, or anti-iranian like the taliban government in afghanistan and saddam hussein's government in iraq. ev
on the united states by mexico so i thought at the time as a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign." grant, of course, in the war was a young lieutenant, and i found this is really moving quote, and that's why it's the title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing that i talked about in the book and i'll talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public in the course of the u.s.-mexico war, not a long war by any means from being really enthuse yays tix and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning in the war, and i see the u.s. mexico war as the moment of america's first anti-war movement actually coming into being so there was anti-war sentiments during the revolution and certainly in the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all deciding that a war that was being more or less successfully waged in another c
by the united states on mexico. i thought so at the time when i was a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign. grant, of course, during the time of the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. and i just found this a really nothing quote and that's what i took it for my title. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico is somehow wicked. one thing that a toddler in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war which was not about war by any means, from being really enthusiastic and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning against the war. and i see the u.s.-mexico war as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happened in 1847 is a consensus really across the board, people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all this, that a war was
, but i was interested in, i think, the real question is what kind of a iraq did the united states leave behind after sacrifice of 145 american lives lost, temperatures of thousands wounded, and hundreds of millions of dollars spent. what was the american policy towards iraq, and what's iraq look like today? that was the question i sought to address, but i covered the entire scope of the war. >> a year op, or, i guess, in december 2011, what had we achieved, and a year on, have we achieved that? >> well, by the time of -- by december 2011, there was a number of elections in iraq which was to the good, but iraq had not fully become a democracy in the sense there was not a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led to another prime minister. that's a true test of a democracy is whether there's not merely an election, and russia has elections, i serve there, but whether there's an election, another candidate wins, and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq is in the at that milestone yet. what we had in december 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but, i thi
kind of iraq did the united states leave behind after all the sacrifice, the american lives lost, the tens of thousands wounded, the billions of dollars expended. what was american policy toward iraq and what does iraq look like today said it is the question that i sought to address by in the up pretty much covered in the entire scope of the war since a lot of reporting on it. >> host: so a year on our december 2011 what have we achieved in a year on had we still achieved then? >> guest: well, why the time, by december of 2011, they're had been a number of elections in iraq, which is to the good, but iraq hadn't fully become a democracy in the sense that it hadn't been a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led by maliki to another pamela starr. i think that is a true test of democracy is whether there isn't an election and russia has elections as i served there there's another candidate wins and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq hasn't set that milestone yet. so, what we had in december of 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but i think un
, if this is the case, what does this mean for how we should understand the course of emancipation in the united states and the difference between freedom and slavery. so i inauguration the become that slavery is national, that slave -- communities of runway slaves should be understood as what we call marooned. fugitive slave communities, and that the links between people of african-american descent in the norway state -- northern states and slaves in the southern states are important circuits of communication activity they we should pay more attention too. >> host: what are the primary documents you used to research your book? >> guest: i was using a lot of different things. i was using narrative that were written by a slave who so-call ran away to freedom, and one thing that struck me is that although we tend to think about the mason dixon line or the ohio river as the great divide and once you got to the other side you were so-called free, and i tended to focus on the first half of the narrative, the experience of enslavement in the south. when you got to the other side, a very powerful theme was th
as westphalian sovereignty. we the people of the united states of america. opening words of the constitution, written in philadelphia, hence philadelphia sovereignty. but what is philadelphia sovereignty, the people are sovereign, the three constitution and the core of the twin pillars of our liberty and consent. so we do have majority rule, but majority rule is limited reconstitution and the whole system of separation of powers, federalism and limited government. a lot of times people get hung up in the republic or democracy. wary compound machine, a regime that is both liberal and democratic or constitutional republic and. you can use any of these terms. alexander hamilton used the term representative democracy. z√úrich government based on majority rule and consent, but that is limited by a constitution, hence the compound machine. one of the major charges raised against king george the third in the declaration of independence was about sovereignty. i've read that church. he, george the third has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowl
in the united states and see what their efforts are. i want to begin with jeanne robinson, chief financial officer of first book. if you could describe what it is to start. >> yes, i just want to say thank you to c-span for all the support you've given tdi or industry and reading, literacy. c-span has been a leader on that and it's wonderful just to salute you. first book is a nonprofit and provides books and educational material to programs, serving cantonese, classroom serving kids in need across the united states. >> how to shoot it started and where the future funding from? >> we started 20 years ago. in fact, were celebrating her 100 millionth book distributed this week, probably when this airs, it will have been last week. we started 20 years ago at martha's table in washington d.c. we have distributed more and more as the years have gone by because we started a new remodel. in recent years redistributed 10 million, 11 million a year. we support programs across the united states is now over 40,000. our funding comes from corporate cause marketing campaigns we do as well as individual
, the eisenhower doctrine and the united states' desire to push back. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid to get itself together to be able to, you know, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil. and the u.s. kind of took a, well, you know, you're really not as important as egypt, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it. and the result was that the prime minister at the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention. and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically the way that oil pricing was conducted by squeezing the independent oil companies -- occidental petroleum first and foremost -- into changing the system whereby there would be a 50/50 split and, basically, controlling interests by u.s. companies in libyan oil. and the consequence of that has come through to this day in terms of increasing the power of, the economic power of the gulf states, available b ya in particular. -- saudi a
is right here, and his wife, jodi, who is somewhere out there, here in the united states, they do wonderful things. wonderful, creative publishing, especially in a world where nobody reads anymore or few do, but you do. glad you're here tonight. after it came out in spain, now it's just come out october 1st here in the states, and i changed a bunch of stuff, a lot of the stuff changed was john's idea. he said, and he was absolutely right saying this chapter here, i don't think anyone's going to understand it, and he also made wonderful suggestions, and so we took a chapter out and put it in after wards, what it was like to get out of diplomatic service and go to rutgers university where i've been ever since as a professor, and in the very late 60s, early 70s, i went there in 69, and i'm still there, and i was supposed to go to vietnam as a culture, and i thought it was a stupid idea, and i had three little children i was not going to abandon that i i thought was not a good war. there's two stories i want to focus on this evening. one is about the day i spent alone with martin luther king in
for the president of the united states. hopkins, whether true or not, some say it is not. hawkins timed out or not story for years. he was a gambler, a bettercombo courses and cars, even the time of day. very three times. between his second and third marriages, dated glamorous women. movie stars like pollock gothard, restores the hail, who jumped from her ethics house apart in new york to her death allegedly because she had been jilted by harry hopkins. the former paris editor of the harper's bazaar, who he married on the second floor of the white house in the summer of 1942. he regarded money, his own and other peoples of a thing to be spent as quickly as possible. put people into two categories. talkers and doers. kerry was definitely a doer. "the hopkins touch" the book begins may 10 to 1840, a year and a half before the united states got into the secular world were. it was the day with the germans overran the low countries and hitler's division were masked in the forest and poised to invade a verge and phrases. it was the day and then they can, 1940, when winston churchill became prime
. looking at conflicts of the organization's and workspace united states, often not the most crucial to those on the ground and sometimes it is difficult to understand. those other questions that they ask. who can i trust? to can i not trust? sow developed a policy that is the question we have to ask what about the relationship of foreign fighters? what kind? overtime there is a pretty good relationship without chitin and i imagine they would point* to the relationship over time that they clashed repeatedly with millicent's and as a result he clashed with other taliban elements in south waziristan. stability of that organization we have to get down to the fine point* how he frames his politics. for. have aggressively do they target people in afghanistan? this is pretty obvious. he supported troops from afghanistan but that is not the case for every militant network fare pretty -- many criminal networks that fought other militant organizations. it is a key question for policy going forward have the pakistan restate looks at the organization's. it is important to us but not the i s i h
legal in most parts of the united states today. so at the 18-coca is very similar, but on the same mountainside by the same people and they both have our polloi as the principal ingredients. the caffeine and the cocaine are both in their pure form powerful stimulants. caffeine is toxic in its purest form and so i wanted to make a comparison about those, and get into the history of cocaine. that is when it crept into the question of coca-cola. the coca-cola company. that fascinated me because i grew up with those rumors. there was cocaine in coca-cola. started to take the cocaine out of coca-cola in 1902-1903. they met a german cocainemaker who basically was the person who would take out the cocaine in new jersey and we could talk today, that pharmaceutical company, that chemical company is still there today, you can go on the web site and every year see how they have to register coca leaf and register the production of cocaine as a control substance. so i went into that history and found out coca-cola -- absence to coca leaf in the last century and where this comes together today a
the president of the united states. hopkins, whether true or not, some say it's not, hopkins behind out on that story for years. he was a gambler on horses and cars, even the time of day. married three times, between the second and third marriages, he dated glamorous womenhave movie stars like paulette goddard, actress dorothy hale, who actually she jumped from her apartment in new york to her death, allegedly because she had been jilted by harry hopkins. the former paris editor of the harper's bazaar, who he married actually on the second floor of the white house the summer of 1942. he regarded money, his own and other people's as something to be spent as quickly as possible. to put people into two categories. talkers and doers. and harry was definitely a do or. so the hopkins touch, the book, begins on may 10, 1940, and that was a year and half before the united states get into the second world war. it was a day when the germans overran the low countries and hitler's panzer division of tanks were masked in our dense forests, poised to invade luxembourg and france. it was a day that wi
of housing exceeds their income. and they're in the top 10% of income in the united states. that means housing is no longer accessible to the middle class. and when the middle class can't buy housing, the middle clarks as we have known it, since 1950, ceases to exist. so that's part two of the book. i've got programs that don't work, programs that do work, and then the intellectual challenge, which really took the longest period to get my head around, was, okay, if you know that these programs don't work and you've got a good fix on why, and you know these programs do work and you have a good fix on why, are you capable of developing a social program or a blueprint for a program that would work? and that turned out to be quite tricky. you would like to have -- help children. you would like to deal with social disadvantage of children, and the road block is simply not in the political wards, whether you're on the left of center, right of center, or right on the center. our government is not about to help children by directing significant social resources to their parents. so, one of the
and break up the united states, thereby initiating the costliest war in the country's history. abraham lincoln noted in the his first inaugural address that, quote: one section of our country believes slavery is right and ought to be extended while the other believes it is wrong b and ought to be extended -- sorry, and ought not to be extended, and this is the only substantial dispute, period. closed quote. the president of the confederate states of america, jefferson davis, reminded his congress in 1861 these are his words: the labor of african slaves was and is indispensable to our prosperity so that with interests of such overwhelming magnitude imperilled by the election to the presidency of an anti-slavery man by abraham lincoln, he meant, the people of the southern states were driven to the adoption of some course of action to avert the danger with which they were openly menaced. and that course of action, of course, was leaving the federal union. davis was not overstating the stakes for him if his fellow -- for him and his fellow slave owners, the more than 12 million souls who r
, basically. and so the thing that's hard to get across to people in the united states or these policymakers is that coca is not cocaine. all right? it's -- and indigenous peoples of this hemisphere should not be punished because some people refine it into can cocaine and abuse it. coca, there's great dignity and value to this lease, and there's an ancient tradition that doesn't harm people, and the arrogance by which the united states foreign policy tries to dictate terms to places like bolivia, less than 1% of excess cocaine in bolivia with ends up in the united states. and yet the heavyhanded nature of u.s. policy, you would think this was some kind of flood coming from bolivia the way we dictate terms to that country. and so, now, imagine if the united nations and the audience of the u.n. convention were to treat coffee the way, with the contempt they treat coca, right? what would happen if they -- and they've told bolivians and peruvians you have to stop chewing coca which they've been doing for centuries, if not thousands of years. imagine if they did that to the united states, you kno
, and they, too, haddock units. and they had library records, and they had roles, and he was able to see there that john locke was reading roger williams. and if thomas jefferson was reading locke, we start to see how these ideas were transatlantic, were moving all over the world well before we think of the global exchange that we have today. these other books show us how people were living, how they were interacting with each other. they also show us how we shaped our economy as we, again, struggle with how we redefine ourselves to new economies, to new political structures throughout the world. we can come to places like this, and we can understand how adjustments were made, how a community could redefine itself and take advantage of opportunities that might not have existed before. and what i love so much about libraries and about history and about research is five people can look at the same book and walk away with five completely different stories and interpretations. seeing what's important to them and making it into something that is relevant for an unimaginable number of commitme
, as well as the united states drone strikes in the area, not as much attention has been paid to the actual people who live there, in their point of view. in our public opinion survey, while not starving and some of its conclusions, i think it's an insight into where future policy might head. here's some of the key findings, and their set forth in the book in detail. nearly nine out of every 10 residents in the fatah region opposed u.s. military operation. this is not a few that slightly held. in fact, passionately and intensely help but here's one measure of why. when only one in 10 people, flat top, flat top, one and 10 full-time residents, in tribal areas think that suicide attacks are ever justified against pakistani military forces, almost six in 10 believe these attacks are justified against the united states military. much of the antipathy towards the united states stems from one cause and one cause really only. and that against cia director jon strikes on militants living in the area. more than three quarters of fatah residents oppose these strikes. however, this opposition to ameri
worldwide with the size of that economy including in japan, the united states, china. look at the trade figures worldwide. in 2010 trade grew coming out of the great recession 13.9%, and in 2011 it was 5%, and i think the final figures for last year, 2012, will be somewhere between 2.5 or 2.7. so it's no wonder that you have the problems that you do in major economies worldwide with the slowdown in trade. and i think that unfortunately, i think that we're going to see a continuation of the problems in europe at least for the most part of 2013, just take a look at the latest figures out of germany which was the strongest economy in the eurozone when it came out. and we have our own problems, as you're aware, here in the united states notwithstanding getting by the immediate crisis at the end of this year on the so-called fiscal cliff. all we managed to do was to put off some of the biggest decisions for another two or three months. so i think, you know, europe has managed along with a little help from ourselves and elsewhere has managed to cloud the world economy. in the case of japan, i
not the mission of the second airborne are 101st or even the marine corps. 19,000 troops, two units had prepared, had been given advance notice and were prepared. why all this for one african american student who wants to get an education, that -- is because the whole state was in an insurrection from the governors, the state house itself down to the 11-year-old who was starring bricks in the street. it was total chaos, total mayhem . even the mississippi highway patrol had pulled away, so there was year insurrection. the -- it lasted two or three days, the violent part, and after that i was appointed to be a security officer for james meredith and went to school with him. he went to school. i stayed outside with a hand-picked patrol, three jeeps, 12 soldiers and we were there throughout the year. we transfer back and forth. almost one year until he graduated in august of 1963. i was 23 years old. i grew up in an all white neighborhood in south minneapolis. that was pretty much it. and so it was an eye-opening for me, but, again, we were trained, and i'm so proud of what the army did. when you w
, they captured all men in the pillbox. remarkably a lieutenant was educated in the united states and he said basically i am ready to surrender. lieutenant edlund said to him to the commander of the fort -- take me to the commander of the fort and that is what he did. with his tiny gun and a fabulous four when trudy locris battery, down an elevator, through an amphitheater that looked like a football field and they went into the depths of this guns and -- guns of navarrone type situation and went to the commanding officer's office. edlund decided to break through the board. at that point of the commanding officer looked at him and said what do you want? he said we would like you to surrender the fort. the commanding officer was incredulous. you are only four men. he picked up the steel telephone. you are my prisoner. at that point robert edlund proudly had one of the greatest moves of world war ii. he pulled out a hand grenade and put it between his legs and said you are going to surrender the locris battery. 800 men from the locris battery surrendered after he broadcast that over the loudspe
in the united states, they do wonderful things, wonderful creative publishing especially in a world where nobody reads anymore or very few do but you do so i am glad you are here tonight. after it came out in spain, in spanish, the university of balenciaga came out and told the first comma here to stay. it changes a bunch of stuff. lot of stuff it change was john's idea. and he was absolutely right. this chapter here i don't think anyone will understand it and also made some wonderful suggestions and so we took a chapter out and i put in an afterword, what would like to get out of diplomatic service and ando cf1 o get out of diplomatic service and and go to rutgers university where i have been ever since as a professor in the 60s or 70s where i went in 69 and i am still there and i was supposed to go to vietnam as a u.s. cultural attache from vietnam and i fought the war was a stupid idea and i had three little children and didn't want to abandon them to a war i di id't believe in. i left the diplomatic service. four years before that were the years in spain. two stories i want to focus on this
in the united states these policy makers is that coca isn't cocaine. indigenous people shouldn't be punished because some people refined into cocaine and abuse state and there's great value and this is an ancient tradition that doesn't harm people and the arrogance by which the foreign policy traced to dictate terms and countries like bolivia less than 1% of any excess cocaine in bolivia and set in the united states. and the heavy-handed nature of the policy would think this is some kind of a flood from bolivia the way that we dictate terms in this country. now imagine if the united nations and the u.n. convention were to treat coffee the way with the content they treat coca what would happen if they tell oblivion's chewing coca which they'd been doing for centuries if not thousands of years imagine if they did that to the united states you have to give up this habit now. she was a major that went to elmhurst college, and in 2001 he comes by europe with the administration to secretly them coffee for one day without notice during finals week as a project so all these students get up in the mo
. during the time my parents were working in the united states, i would look at the mountain something about my parents being on the other side. >> host: where did you grow up originally? >> host: where did you grow up? >> guest: the little town in mexico that no one has heard of. but when they mention it, if you mention acapulco, people know where it is. it's about three hours away from their my father came here in 1977 and december my mother a few years later. my mother came here in 1980 when i was 4.5 years old. >> host: when did you come to the united states. >> guest: i came in 1985, in the month of may of 1985, i was nine and a half years old. >> host: what can you tell us about coming to the united states? >> guest: i have been separated from my father for about eight years. when he was sent to mexico in 1985, my family convinced him to come back here. to take us to the united states, we beg him to bring us here. we didn't want to spend any more time separated from him. i was nine under happen he thought it wouldn't be able to make across the border. because we had to run across
to the united states, what our relationship with the middle east was. and that led to the bin ladens, a book intended to be about saudi arabia and how complicated for this generation of oil broomers to come of age in the 70s when the kingdom was awash in wealth and had to all go out and buy identities in the world, and unand one of them became a notorious terrorist do and the others moved to florida. and when i finished with that project i wanted to write about oil and american power in the post-9/11 context, and i started out -- actually the book about exxonmobil began as a book about oil and geopolitics. i wanted to essentially take the prize, the book by dany ergen that had inspired me and update it. i thought of the prize as a great work of nonfiction about the era of oil that was an era of expansion and discovery, and i wanted to write a book about global oil in the era of limits and constraintses and climates and the rest of it. so i started out on that kind of open framework and got -- thought i needed a subject, company. and once i came to that conclusion, then for an american audien
the embargo. it is a great question u.s. a lot of confidence just as they had made the united states what it was between 17871960 that they could succeed and make this of a country, independent , a nation state, and that they could build a proper nation state in the 19th century sense of the word on the basis of cotton. they talked about this a lot. they compare themselves to other european countries in terms of population, national resources, the value of the trade. they were riding high. the confederacy's often look understood. we tend to look at it as a defensive move. it decided to take this gamble. they did take a gamble, but the only slave-holding class in the 19th century world to get it. slaveholders did not do. why did these guys? that is a really interesting question, and i try to explain, there was a mindset. completely fascinating to get inside the mind of this incredibly powerful, not just in terms of social power and wealth, but political power of this elite, and they were running the united states and did not doubt their ability to do this separately. confidence is there. b
's not been obvious to many governments around the world. the government of the united kingdom that spent a decade asking and promoting what it saw as nonviolent islamist extremist groups under the theory that only they could talk to the and dissuade violent extremists only to income in the end, the end of the blair period, that the shared world view was disastrous, and that, obviously, they should be backing antiextremists, individuals, and arguments. chambers' story, as has been said, is not the story of the loss of faith, but the acceptance of faith, christianity. in the current islamic case, the analogy is not perfect, but there is an analogy. after all, chambers was born into a faith and culture of christianity, in and around new york, in the first decade of the 20th century. he did not, in the end, adopt some foreign religion, but his own religion. that of his ancestors. similarly, we don't have to seek to have islamists convert to a foreign religion, but rather claim islam of their own ancestors, one unpoisenned by the extremism we associate with al-qaeda. the problem for us is tha
of the united kingdom which spent about a decade financing and promoting what it saw as nonviolent islamist extremist groups under the theory that only they could talk and dissuade the violent extremists. only to conclude in the end, really about the end of the blair period, that the shared worldview was disastrous, and that obviously they should be backing anti-extremists, individuals and arguments. chambers story, as has been said, is not only the story of the loss in faith but the acceptance of faith. in the current islamist case, the analogy is not perfect. but there is an analogy. after all, chambers was born into a faith and culture of christianity in and around new york in the first decade of the 20th century. he did not in the end about some foreign religion. he adopted his own religion. that of his ancestors. similarly, we don't have to seek to have islamists convert to what is to them a foreign religion, but rather reframe the islam of their own ancestors, one than poisoned by the extremism we associate with office in and al qaeda. the problem for us is communism and christianity
come to the united states who had come out first to see the second lady and then had come to the united states to study. pat didn't limit her contact on her travels to important people. she treated everyone she met as though they were the most important person in the world. the people she met sensed her sincerity and responded to it. third, she was happiest in her role when she could take action. the party the nixons were at and the engagement they were going to were not as important at that moment as getting this visitor from india a seat at the presidential dinner. in the greater scheme of things, this is really a small act. but it left a lasting impression both on the woman involved, the indian woman involved, and on the women at the table that she was eventually seated at. that's how we actually know about the event, is through a letter that someone who she ended up sitting with responded and wrote to pat later about it. for pat politics was her job and one she didn't always enjoy. while on occasion she was proud of her work in helping to raise funds for the party, she found many of
. and a lot of faith that just as they had made the united states what it was between 1778 and 1860 they could succeed and make the other country independent and they could build a proper nation state in the 19th century sense of the word on the basis of cotton and slaves. they talked about this a lot. at the time of succession and for the first couple of years of war. they compared themselves to other european countries in population, resources, value of trade. they were riding high. i think it's the confederacy often misunderstood. we tend to think of as defensive move. they were losing in the union. they decided to, you know, take this gamble. they did take a gamble. they were only slave holding class in the 19th century war who did it. the brazilian, cuban didn't. why did they do it? that's an interesting question. i try to explain a little bit in the book. what was mind set. it's completely fascinating to get inside the mind of the incredibly powerful not just in terms of social power and wealth but political power of this planter elite. they were used to running the united states and the
that the united states would eventually turn back the timing is threat to western civilization, just as surely as it had done to the equally evil threat posed by nazi germany. not, mind you, that we underestimate the might of the soviet military or the strength and resolve of the anti-anti-communist forces, the rate against us both at home and abroad. there were times we came close -- other conservative communists like james burnham wrote a book titled suicide of the west. we feared they might be right. for me, one especially discouraging education was the fight against ronald reagan's decision in 1983 to station a medium-range missiles in europe to counter the soviet buildup of similar missiles on his side of the dividing line between its domain and the west. massive protests were planned here at home and all over the world, with the biggest one scheduled for the hague, to which over 1 million people from every country in western europe were streaming pipeline, by bus, and on foot. the dutch broadcasters have erected a glass booth overlooking the square to which the protesters were all marchi
is still nothing more than a unit of communication. but the -- so i really started looking into this. did a lot of, you know, research, a lot of looking into the presidents. and the storyline in this, it's an a to z book, so you can go and dip in as you see fit. some of the stuff is funny, some not so funny. but really what the nexus of the whole thing is if you look back at the beginnings of this country and the whole concept of language and of what this country was, there's a letter that's written between benjamin franklin and noah webster, the dictionary maker, in which they talk about acts of resistance, acts of rebellion, acts of response to the british. and they're talking, they use various words to talk about it, but they're really sort of american acts to sort of identify who we are as a people. and what are involved in these acts? one of the acts is public libraries. benjamin franklin has come to this country, his father's come to this country smuggling a bible, smuggling a bible into the seat of a chair and tells benjamin at one point that one of the things, most important thing
policy. we don't live in a free market in the united states, we live in a mixed economy. it varies by industry. technology which by the way has done very well, the most regulated industry in the world this financial-services. that's where we had our biggest problem, not surprisingly because that's where we had our biggest problems. second of the policy created a massive disinvestment. they got focused on the residential real-estate market. the global burst as all due. at the large financial institutions that calls wall street and made serious mistakes. if i had been in charge of a but let the institutions fail. however the states were secondary and in the context of an incentive by government policy. almost everything we've done in the financial crisis started was a long time period even things that might be helping a low but in the short term will dramatically reduce the standard of living in the long-term. fifth point even though there's and a lot of economic financial causes the real cost to the real cure philosophical, and i'm going to focus on that in my presentation, and then
of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington d.c., january 1, 2013. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable barbara boxer, a senator from the state of california, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: patrick j. leahy, president pro tempore. mr. reid: madam president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: so good to see the presiding officer presiding. madam president, after leader remarks, the senate will be in a period of morning business. senators will be allowed to speak for up to ten minutes each. we're waiting here on the house doing something finally on the cliff, we hope. we have sandy. we're waiting on that. and we have a series of economic -- executive nominations we need to clear today. i'm told h.r. 459 is at the desk and due for second reading. the presiding officer: the clerk
. [laughter] this and the sea in 1964 was here for the first tour of the united states for the royals she found herself sitting next to paul mccartney. of course, she did. [laughter] the most remarkable thing is she was not just a witness to history she lived in extraordinary life and those are taking place over the sentry born in england the little girls were expected to grow up to be a wife and mother but nothing else. but things change and she changed. i hope the book will contribute to younger women's understandings of what their mothers and grandmothers went through and not to take for granted all that they have. she earned all the time to have a life of her own. that was about having her own unique identity not just as someone's mother or wife for as much as she enjoyed being a mother or also mrs. richard helms. she was more than that. that was important said every human being once their own identity. we will begin with their service in world war ii. growing up on the southeast coast of england and for the millennium that part had been invaded by vikings. the people of that area wer
as soon as possible. i contributed to a conference recently in the united nations in new york. it was one of these peace conferences, dialogue of cultures, dialogue of religions, so on and so forth shortly after the film was made by some boarish film in the united states, and this, of course, again, yet again led to killings all over the world, everybody batoning down the hatches, and the question i ask myself, and, again, the sort of question i ask what contributed to the books, why is it that any one religion considers that it is so -- it cannot be commented on either through film or theater or through song, what's any theme, any prohibition is in the public domain, it is subject to public commentary, and for any religion to claim this, it's a con tin ration of the same that denigrated other religions in their time. .. >> one needs to start propagati . >> we are publishing an article very soon it is a personal and private conduct, then it is no business of government. and it is ridiculous that the government should have this. my hand touching yours, it's no different in somalia. a man s
powerful love and faith in the united states of america and the civilization for which it had gone to the war against the great carriers of the modern totalitarianism, first nazi germany and now communist russia. unlike chambers, we believe that the united states would eventually turn back the communist threats to the western civilization just as surely as it had done to the equally evil threat posed by nazi germany. not my view that we underestimated the line of the soviet military or the strength and resolve of the anti-communist forces both at home and abroad. both at times we can close during the chambers and other conservative anti-communist like james burnham who live in a book entitled suicide of the west we fear they might be right. for me when especially discouraging occasion is the fight against ronald reagan's decision in 1983 to station medium-range missiles in europe and to counter the soviet buildup of the soviet missile on its side has the dividing line of its domain on the west. massive protests were planned at home and all over the world was the biggest one schedul
. he was convinced that it would be taken from the united states that the united states entered the war. entered world war ii on behalf of the british. nothing is more important than making sure that there was no war. keeping britain out of the water and then the united states out of the war. and he did everything that he possibly could. he violated protocol, he did not file orders. he met secretly with german diplomats and he was convinced that as a businessman, he knew how to negotiate a deal. and that if he were put in a room with hitler, the two of them could negotiate and he refused to see that hitler was a madman. but he didn't care about the german people. but he had other fears that drove him. he told the leader of the zionist community, i'm going to go meet with them and work it out. he became so anti-churchill, antiwar effort, that the british spying on him, which i found in the national archives in britain. there are records of his conversation with german diplomats. he wanted to negotiate an end to the war. to negotiate a settlement that would prevent war and that would resc
something the other day and it is nothing more than a unit of communication. so i started looking into this. a lot of research and looking into the presidents. the storyline in this, it is in a tizzy buck. so some of this stuff is funny and some of it is not so funny. what's really the nexus of the whole thing is if you look back at the early beginnings of this country and the whole concept of language and what this country was. there is a letter written between benjamin franklin and noah webster. in which they talk about the witness acts of rebellion against the british. and the use of various words to talk about it. but they are really sort of american acts to identify who we are as a people. one of the acts is public libraries. coming to this country, his father came smuggling a bible. he tells benjamin at one point that one of the things we could do is be a printer. the idea that when england come at that time, when his father came over, i was very interested in these definitions and so when he creates a free library of philadelphia, is seen as an act of resistance against the british.
a country like united states trying to work after its own history of racial antagonism, 1 mile is we transcend to build a multiracial community but posters reality by oppression hopefully we will move beyond it. but they both fall under that umbrella. >> host: go to the second example of a ignoring race. why it's important? >> it is important not to make a fetish but not to discuss it means it is already in the room but we have to be careful that is the historical position we have been through this but now to move forward to pretend we have not run this are already? to know what we want the community to become the look of the differences that divide us. it is a fine ninth to make too much or make a fetish are everyone could have a vested interest. >> host: professor jackson what is the role of political correctness? at. >> guest: it is easy to take the pot shot but it tries to place a premium on its ability. we don't want to offend our make them feel uncomfortable but when that is connected to an aversion to of any discussion at all but when you don't talk about race in the network i
in the united states and the notion of sectionalism that organizes our understanding of american political history? but slavery is national and communities of runaway slaves should be understood understood, of a rude of future to the slave community and the links between those of african descent and slaves in the southern states are important circuits that we should pay more attention to. >> host: what are the primary documents you used? >> i used a lot of different things. i used narratives written by slaves that had run away to freedom. what struck me is although we think about the mason-dixon line or the ohio river then you were free, but we tend to focus on the first path of the narrative of the enslavement in the south sat when you got to the other side, as the gray area of freedom and how precarious life was in the so-called free states and many runaways felt the need to go to canada or britain because there was no way to achieve freedom because of the slave laws. these were important. looking at the emancipation statutes passed by individual states and recognizing basically they onl
persecution. it was one of the original 13 colonies of the united states and has a rich literary culture steeped in history. with the help of our local cable partner, cox communications, booktv brings you interviews and tours of the area all weekend long from our recent visit. >> my name is morgan grefe, and i'm executive director of the rhode island historical society, and we're in the stacks of the rhode island historical society library on the east side of prove department. we have an assortment of -- providence. we have an assortment of books. the first few are actually related to roger williams, probably the most famous founder of rhode island. there were more than one for the colony of rhode island, is so roger williams gets the most attention, and these books are some of the reasons why. the first book we're going to look at today is called "the key into the language of america." and it was published in 1643. it's an origin binding, so it is kept in this case. this book is 1643, and it is the first-ever dictionary of an indian language in english. this is an original printing, pri
the countries and businesses depend more on the banking system than they do here in the united states. why? because with a more developed capital market. and so that it was developed capital market, so although it is starting to develop more rapidly. and so the key as i said to getting them back to growth is the banking system. and so all the things i've mentioned here are very important. european central bank has put in the ltros, three-year loans at 1%. they did that a year ago. and now they've done the omb. they've lessened the amount of collateral necessary to par with european central banks. and the banking system there has been shedding assets because they had to raise additional capital. and they've income stream more on that been thinking, unfortunately, and a lot of you in this room are aware of that. and some of the benefactors of that, beneficiaries are japanese banks have been buying portfolios and investors like will up on the market. but we've got to get the european banks back up to lending. that is key to all of what i have said here. then i would just say a few words about
become good citizens and free people in the united states. but when he got back to the united states, things changed. he came back with his daughter, pat c. it turned out she needed a dowry because she met her husband, thomas mann randolph and they decided to get married in a hurry from the only way jefferson could set them up in the household was to give them land and a lot of slaves. he gave his daughter 25, little and big. he began to think of rebuilding monticello and he needed money they needed to rely on to retrain displaced worse. he suddenly called upon them to acquire a faster read new skills, which they did very, very quickly. so when i was following jefferson to the documents alone my own timeline, i came across a document that disturbs many people since they put it in print, but not as much as it disturbs me when i found it. in a detailed financial memo, jefferson was kind of profits and losses of virginia plantations when it suddenly occurred to him there's a phenomenon in which he perceived a monticello but it never measured he preceded enclosed in brackets, but jeffers
's not quite true. the first fracks were done in the united states in the gas industry, i believe in missouri in 1947. if i remember correctly. and fracking, by the way, is used in the gas industry on a massive scale ever since. so suddenly we become aware of fracking. it's been going on before our eyes but many notice all along. the people who brought it back, hour, were the canadian who brought it to russia in 1988, then big time after the soviet union fell apart. and fracking started to be applied on a massive scale in starting in about 1998. now the point of the story is this, even though it was new to the russians, practicedically speaking in stwaight. it become a russian big -- they were doing fracking on a larger scale. it gives you one measure of the lag and the lag quickly overcome. at the opposite extreme, however, there are techniques that are completely out in russians and that require a whole different aura of capability because they are more difficult. and the prime example of arctic offshore. now there are two examples in the world of countries that have gone from zero to sixty
in the united states in the gas industry i believe in missouri in 1947 if i remember correctly. and fracking, by the way, has been used in the gas industry on a massive scale ever since. it's been going on beneath our notice all along. the people who brought it back, however, were the canadians who brought it to russia in 988 -- 1988. and fracking started to be applied on a massive scale starting in about 1998. now, the point of the story is this: even though it was new to the russians, practically speaking, in 1998, by 2000, 2001 it had become a russian business, and there were russian companies and russian crews who were doing fracking at the, you know, on a massive scale. so this gives you one measure. at the opposite extreme, however, are techniques that are completely new to the russians and that require a whole different order of capability because they are so much more difficult. and the prime example is offshore. there are two examples in the world of countries that have gone 0-60 in developing arctic offshore. norway and now brazil. those two are really the touchstones. they are the
a unit of communication. so i really started looking at a lot of research and looking into the presidents. the storyline in this is an abc book so some of the stuff is funny and some of it's not so funny. really the nexus of the whole thing is if you look back in the beginnings of this country and the whole concept of language and of what this country was there is a letter that is written between benjamin franklin and noah webster the dictionary maker in which they talk about acts of resistancresistanc e, acts of rebellion, acts of response to the british and they are using various words to talk about it but they are really american asked to identify who we are as a people. and one of the acts is a public library. franklin has -- and his father come to this country smuggling of bible and tells benjamin at one point that one of the most important things you should use as a printer. this is the idea that when england at that time when his father came over when the franklins came over in england there were two printing presses one in oxford and one in london. franklin was very interested in
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